ORGANIZATION
BHQ 60TH COY BUFFS COY VICS COY BAND CADETS RHQ
ASSOCIATION
PARENT NFLD-MARITIMES TORONTO CALGARY VANCOUVER ISLAND THE POWDER HORN THE QOR BURSARY
HISTORY
EARLY DAYS THE FENIAN RAID THE NW REBELLION WORLD WAR I WORLD WAR II POST WAR PRESENT DAY RIFLE REGIMENTS VICTORIA CROSS BATTLE HONOURS COLONEL-IN-CHIEF FAMOUS MEMBERS ALLIANCES AIRBORNE ROLE QOR 2010 GALLERY REPOSITORY RSOs
COMMUNITY
MEMORIALS TRUST FUND MUSEUM BLACK NET ST. PAUL'S CANTERBURY THE LAST POST
SOCIAL
CALENDAR JR RANKS' MESS SERGEANTS' MESS OFFICERS' MESS BAND EVENTS KITSHOP MAPLE LEAF CLUB

 

 

The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada

The Northwest Rebellion 1885

The Mobilization

Militia soldiers from all across Canada answered the call to arms. The head of the CPR, W.C. Van Horne, promised Prime Minister MacDonald that he would transport all of the troops to Saskatchewan on the condition that he was allowed to do all the planning without interference from the army staff.

The Second Regiment, Queen's Own Rifles were ordered to parade at the drill shed at 9 a.m. on Saturday March 30th. The turnout was enthusiastic and when it was announced that only two hundred fifty men were required, a fierce competition for these positions ensued. By nightfall the service battalion had been selected. These men were poorly equipped; so the City Council stepped in with a donation of gloves, underclothing, toques, and mufflers for all other rank volunteers.

All day Saturday and Sunday the troops were outfitted and stores made ready for shipment. On Monday morning two special trains were loaded at Union Station. The first contained Lieutenant-Colonel Otter and his staff, C Company of the Infantry School Corps, and the Queen's Own Rifles. The 10th Royal Grenadiers followed on the second train. At noon on the 30th of March these trains pulled slowly out of Toronto. Once clear of the city, twenty-three Queen's Own stowaways appeared. They were allowed to stay.

The trip to the West was, for many, the hardest part of the campaign. The CPR line was not complete. There were four major gaps along the north side of Lake Superior. At some of these gaps the CPR had sleighs to carry the men and equipment but at others the men were required to march across the frozen lake. Even in areas where there was track the men suffered. There were not enough passenger cars, so open flat cars were used to transport the men through the frozen night. Eventually they made it to Port Arthur where passenger cars were waiting. From there the run to Qu' Appelle Station was uneventful.

General Middleton's plan was to advance with three columns. The first was to march on Batoche from Qu' Appelle with Middleton in command. The second, under Lieutenant-Colonel Otter, would take the train to Swift Current and then march north to relieve Battleford. The third, commanded by Major-General Strange, was made up of the Alberta Feild Force who were already in Calgary and thwere to march to Edmonton. This would place all three columns on the North Saskatchewan River. They could use the river to link up again and deal with any other problems in the area.

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"In Pace Paratus - In Peace Prepared"