ORGANIZATION
BHQ 60TH COY BUFFS COY VICS COY BAND CADETS RHQ
ASSOCIATION
PARENT NFLD-MARITIMES TORONTO CALGARY VANCOUVER ISLAND THE POWDER HORN THE QOR BURSARY
HISTORY
EARLY DAYS THE FENIAN RAID THE NW REBELLION WORLD WAR I WORLD WAR II POST WAR PRESENT DAY RIFLE REGIMENTS VICTORIA CROSS BATTLE HONOURS COLONEL-IN-CHIEF FAMOUS MEMBERS ALLIANCES AIRBORNE ROLE QOR 2010 GALLERY REPOSITORY RSOs
COMMUNITY
MEMORIALS TRUST FUND MUSEUM BLACK NET ST. PAUL'S CANTERBURY THE LAST POST
SOCIAL
CALENDAR JR RANKS' MESS SERGEANTS' MESS OFFICERS' MESS BAND EVENTS KITSHOP MAPLE LEAF CLUB

 

The First World War

With the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, Canada responded by sending the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The Queen's Own provided the vast majority of men to the Third Battalion CEF . While it was thought The Queen's Own would be allowed to retain its regimental identity, Ottawa refused to allow the battalion to wear its cap badge. Instead, small groups from the 10th Grenadiers (Toronto) and the Governor General's Bodyguard (Ottawa) were posted into the already over strength battalion, making the 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment) CEF a composite unit. One of the most extraordinary decisions taken by Colonel, The Honourable, Sam Hughes Minister of Militia and Defence at the outbreak of the First World War was that the Regiments and Corps of the Canadian Expeditionary Force would lose their proud titles and revert to a quasianonymous numbered method of identification. This would cause endless problems after the war with Battle Honours and perpetuation, as we shall see. Two notable exceptions were the Royal Canadian Regiment, which had not proceeded to France with the original contingent, but sailed to Bermuda to relieve the 2nd Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment and the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry which was originally raised for service in the British Army.

The QOR also recruited the 83rd, 95th, 166th, 198th and 255th Battalions. All were QOR battalions and perpetuated by the QOR. The 19th, 35th, 58th, 74th, 81st, 123rd and 216th Battalions, though not perpetuated by the Regiment, also consisted of QOR personnel.

The 3rd Bn CEF fought in Northern France and Belgium, from Amiens to Langemark. Twenty-one battle honours were awarded during the war and by 11 November 1918, 7,562 Queen's Own had served overseas. Of these 1,254 were killed in action, died of wounds or of other causes. Six soldiers who had served with or been attached to The Queen's Own were awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry.

In May 1920 the Regiment was once again renamed, this for the final time, becoming The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada.

In 1939 The Queen’s Own Rifles supplied a Guard of Honour to celebrate the Silver Jubilee of King George V in May of that year.

 

"In Pace Paratus - In Peace Prepared"